Advertisement

April 18, 2014

Consistently Growing Jobs and Our Economy

Our nation’s labor market added 171,000 nonfarm payroll jobs in October, while the unemployment rate remained essentially unchanged at 7.9 percent. Additionally, our economy added back more than 84,000 jobs in August and September than had been initially reported.

October’s report marks 32 straight months of private sector job growth totaling more than 5.4 million jobs. We’ve also seen 13 consecutive quarters of private gross domestic product growth. In other words, we’ve been consistently growing jobs and our economy for several years running.

Our unemployment rate has dropped by more than two percentage points under President Obama. Unemployment Insurance claims are at a four-year low. Consumer sentiment is at a four-year high. We’ve added more than a half-million manufacturing jobs over the last 32 months. And we just posted the largest 12-month increase in housing permits since 1983.

We’ve transformed a terrible crisis into a stable and durable recovery. To state otherwise is to wage war on the facts. We’ve erased all of the private sector job losses since the president took office and created an additional 1.2 million new jobs.

We know what works, and the president has a plan to accelerate our progress by investing in education and job training, and by creating good-paying 21st century jobs in health care, energy, technology and manufacturing. Our recovery depends on building a strong and educated middle class that creates enough demand for the private sector to keep adding new jobs. These efforts are foundational to our success in a 21st century economy.

© Copyright 2014 U.S. Department of Labor

About the Author

Our Mission is to foster, promote, and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers, and retirees of the United States; improve working conditions; advance opportunities for profitable employment; and assure work-related benefits and rights.

866-487-2365

Boost: AJAX core statistics

Legal Disclaimer

You are responsible for reading, understanding and agreeing to the National Law Review's (NLR’s) and the National Law Forum LLC's  Terms of Use and Privacy Policy before using the National Law Review website. The National Law Review is a free to use, no-log in database of legal and business articles. The content and links on www.NatLawReview.com are intended for general information purposes only. Any legal analysis, legislative updates or other content and links should not be construed as legal or professional advice or a substitute for such advice. No attorney-client or confidential relationship is formed by the transmission of information between you and the National Law Review website or any of the law firms, attorneys or other professionals or organizations who include content on the National Law Review website. If you require legal or professional advice, kindly contact an attorney or other suitable professional advisor.  

Some states have laws and ethical rules regarding solicitation and advertisement practices by attorneys and/or other professionals. The National Law Review is not a law firm nor is www.NatLawReview.com  intended to be  a referral service for attorneys and/or other professionals. The NLR does not wish, nor does it intend, to solicit the business of anyone or to refer anyone to an attorney or other professional.  NLR does not answer legal questions nor will we refer you to an attorney or other professional if you request such information from us. 

Under certain state laws the following statements may be required on this website and we have included them in order to be in full compliance with these rules. The choice of a lawyer or other professional is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements. Attorney Advertising Notice: Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Statement in compliance with Texas Rules of Professional Conduct. Unless otherwise noted, attorneys are not certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, n