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April 25, 2014

'The Daily Caller' Reports that Republicans may Introduce the 'Achieve Act' as an Alternative to the DREAM Act

The Daily Caller, a publication founded by conservative journalist Tucker Carlson, is reporting that Republicans may seek to introduce their alternative to the DREAM Act, which is being called the “Achieve Act.” In Details about the GOP’s alternative to the DREAM Act emerge, Matt K. Lewis reports that the Achieve Act contains multiple tiers, including the W-1 visa/nonimmigrant status. 

There is little concrete information about this proposal, however, the article indicates that someone holding W-1 status would be allowed to attend college or serve in the military, and after doing so, the W-1 could apply for a four-year non-immigrant work visa. Some of the information being floated about the Achieve Act includes a few requirements for obtaining W-1 status:

  • Applicants must have lived in the U.S. for five years prior to enactment of the Achieve Act
  • Applicants must have entered the U.S. before age 14
  • Applicants must have good moral character, must not have committed a felony, or more than one misdemeanor with a jail term of more than 30 days, must not have committed a crime involving moral turpitude, and must not be subject to final order of removal.

There is no clear information on whether the Achieve Act would allow applicants to eventually obtain permanent residence in the United States.

©2014 Greenberg Traurig, LLP. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Kathryn N. Karam Immigration Law Attorney at Greenberg Traurig Law Firm
Associate

Kathryn N. Karam focuses her practice on international immigration law. She represents corporate clients with regard to Nonimmigrant visas, employment-based petitions, family-based petitions, maintenance of permanent residence, and citizenship matters. She has previously represented clients in matters relating to the Violence against Women Act (VAWA), issues with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and detention and removal matters.

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