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April 23, 2014

Getting the Most From Your Good Idea: The Importance of Intellectual Property Law for Innovators

Entrepreneurial success depends on any number of ingredients, but all sound start-ups have one thing in common: a good idea. To safeguard this crucial element, early-stage companies must act—and act early—to protect their unique knowledge. By securing a patent, innovators gain the legal tool with which to protect their intellectual property. Drawing on both industry and legal expertise, burgeoning businesses can take proper action when a competitor infringes on their intellectual property, and are also able to avoid hot water due to infringement on others’ patents.

For more on green tech intellectual property, please see the Cleantech Business News article, “Protect Yourself by Standing Out from the Crowd.”

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About the Author

Thomas R. Burton III, Corporate Attorney, Mintz Levin Law Firm
Member

Tom’s practice focuses on complex corporate finance matters including mergers and acquisitions, venture capital, private equity, and securities transactions. He represents high-growth and emerging businesses, including companies in the energy and clean technology, social media and software industries, as well as life science companies, from start-ups to public companies.

In 2004, Tom founded, and currently chairs, the firm’s Energy & Clean Technology Practice, which serves more than 250 clients. Since 2006, the firm’s Energy & Clean Technology Practice...

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