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April 18, 2014

How to Monitor Your Online Reputation

Reputation is everything for attorneys. A good reputation gets you more clients through referrals; a bad one pretty much dooms your practice. So it’s no surprise that lawyers tend to pay close attention to cultivating a reputation as effective, ethical counselors.

But is all your hard work toward that goal reflected in your online reputation?

What do prospects see when they type your name into a search engine? If it’s not much, that can often be as harmful as something negative.

This infographic provides some tips on monitoring your online reputation:

  

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About the Author

Stephen Fairley legal marketing expert, law office management
CEO

Stephen is the CEO of The Rainmaker Institute, the nation's largest law firm marketing  company specializing in lead conversion for small law firms and solo practitioners. Over 8,000 attorneys nationwide have benefited from learning and implementing the proven Rainmaker Marketing System.

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