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April 25, 2014

New Hampshire Right to Work? Not So Fast

On Feb. 13, 2013, the New Hampshire House of Representatives voted downthe latest right-to-work bill and thwarted yet another attempt to join the latest RTW states (Indiana and Michigan). This is the third time that this type of legislation had been defeated in the previous three years (prior two attempts were vetoed by the former Governor) in New Hampshire. It appears that the RTW in that state is losing momentum.

Elsewhere, as previously covered earlier this week on this blog, the RTW law in Michigan is under legal attack. 

© 2014 BARNES & THORNBURG LLP

About the Author

Adam Bartrom, Labor, Employment Attorney, Barnes Thornburg, Law firm
Associate

Adam Bartrom of the firm’s Labor and Employment Law Department collaborates with businesses to handle disputes and to create preventive strategies of all sizes. Adam dedicates his practice to representing management interests on the employment and traditional labor fronts. On the employment side, Adam routinely represents employers in state and federal courts and administrative agencies, such as the DOL, EEOC and other federal, state, and local administrative agencies. Adam has also effectively represented employers against claims of misappropriation of trade secrets, unfair...

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