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July 22, 2014

New Visa Bulletin Shows Progress in Employment-Based Categories - April 2013 Visa Bulletin

On March 11th, the U.S. released the April 2013 visa bulletin, which is available at http://travel.state.gov/visa/bulletin/bulletin_5900.html. Although there were no surprises in priority date movement, there was forward progression in most of the Employment-based categories.

Major changes in priority date movement in the Employment-based categories include EB-2 China moving from February 15, 2008 to April 1, 2008. However, EB-2 India saw no movement. Also EB-3 All Chargeability Areas (commonly known as "rest-of-the-world") and EB-3 Mexico moved from May 1, 2007 to July 1, 2007. In addition, EB-3 China moved from January 22, 2007 to April 22, 2007.  

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About the Author

Kathryn N. Karam Immigration Law Attorney at Greenberg Traurig Law Firm
Associate

Kathryn N. Karam focuses her practice on international immigration law. She represents corporate clients with regard to Nonimmigrant visas, employment-based petitions, family-based petitions, maintenance of permanent residence, and citizenship matters. She has previously represented clients in matters relating to the Violence against Women Act (VAWA), issues with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and detention and removal matters.

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