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April 18, 2014

Privacy-on-the-Go: Make Sure That “Killer App” Has A Privacy Policy — UPDATE

 

 

We posted this alert back in March, and now California Attorney General Kamala Harris has released a recommended set of privacy best practices for app developers and advertising networks entitled “Privacy on the Go:  Recommendations for the Mobile Ecosystem.” Written after consulting a “broad spectrum of stakeholders,” including app developers, ad networks, privacy professionals and privacy advocates, the best practices urges those developing apps to consider building privacy protections in from the start and to display brief notices prior to taking actions such as data collection.

Those of us here at the Privacy & Security Matters blog approve of the title.

Original March 13, 2012 post:

Although one would never realize it when downloading many popular mobile apps on any of the major platforms (Apple’s iTunes, Google, Amazon, RIM, HP, etc.) — the requirements of California’s Online Privacy Protection Act to have a “clear and conspicuous” privacy policy apply to mobile apps as well as online website.   California’s Attorney General has reached an agreement on a set of principles with Apple, Google, Amazon, HP, RIM and Microsoft that will see all companies implementing new standards for displaying privacy policies for apps that collect personal data.

“We can sue and we will sue,”  Attorney General Kamala D. Harris said when announcing the agreement.   For more, including tips for app developers, see our Mintz Levin client alert here.

 

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About the Author

Cynthia Larose, Privacy, Security, Attorney, Mintz Levin, Law Firm
Member

Cynthia is Chair of the firm’s Privacy & Security Practice and a Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP).  She represents companies in information, communications, and technology, including e-commerce and other electronic transactions. She counsels clients through all stages of the “corporate lifecycle,” from start-ups through mid- and later-stage financings to IPO, and has broad experience in technology and business law, including online contracting issues, licensing, domain name issues, software development, and complex outsourcing transactions.

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