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April 18, 2014

Significant Proposed Changes for Federal Health Care Programs in President’s Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Plan

On April 10, 2013, President Obama released his budget proposal for fiscal year 2014.  The President reiterated his long-standing goal of reducing the deficit by $4.3 trillion over 10 years and his willingness to do so in part by saving $400 billion from changes to federal health programs, including Medicare and Medicaid.  According to the President’s budget document, these savings would be enough to cancel the sequestration required by the Budget Control Act of 2011, which went into effect in March 2013.  The President’s budget contains a number of notable proposals affecting Medicare payment to hospitals, post-acute providers, labs, pharmaceutical companies and others.  This White Paper identifies and summarizes some of the more noteworthy proposed changes.

Please click here to view the entire White Paper in Adobe PDF format.

© 2014 McDermott Will & Emery

About the Author

Associate

Elizabeth K. Isbey is an associate in the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery LLP and is based in the Firm’s Washington, D.C., office.  She focuses her practice on health law.

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About the Author

Partner

Eric Zimmerman is a partner in the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery LLP and is based in the Firm's Washington, D.C. office.  Eric is co-chair of the Firm’s Life Sciences Government Strategies team, and is a member of the Firm’s Government Strategies practice and Personalized Medicine team.  Eric is a recognized Medicare law and policy authority who helps clients navigate federal legislative and regulatory processes related to Medicare coverage, coding, reimbursement and compliance.  He primarily counsels and represents hospitals and health...

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