Advertisement

April 16, 2014

Steve Antonakes, Acting Deputy Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), Addresses Bankers

On April 17, Steve Antonakes, Acting Deputy Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), addressed the American Bankers Association meeting in Washington, D.C. Mr. Antonakes’s remarks should be required reading for any banker who wants to understand the mission of the CFPB, and how its mission is different than that of traditional bank regulators. It is worth noting that the CFPB itself will examine the more than 200 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)-insured institutions with assets in excess of $10 billion, and will write the consumer protection rules for all FDIC-insured institutions as well as non-FDIC-insured participants in the financial system.

Mr. Antonakes’s speech is available here.

©2014 Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP

About the Author

Jeffrey M. Werthan, Mergers Acquisitions Attorney, Katten Muchin law firm
Partner

Jeffrey M. Werthan is head of the firm’s Banking practice. He has extensive experience representing clients in connection with bank formations, both public and private capital raises, mergers and acquisitions of financial institutions, compensation for financial institution executives and bank regulatory and enforcement issues.

202-625-3569

Boost: AJAX core statistics

Legal Disclaimer

You are responsible for reading, understanding and agreeing to the National Law Review's (NLR’s) and the National Law Forum LLC's  Terms of Use and Privacy Policy before using the National Law Review website. The National Law Review is a free to use, no-log in database of legal and business articles. The content and links on www.NatLawReview.com are intended for general information purposes only. Any legal analysis, legislative updates or other content and links should not be construed as legal or professional advice or a substitute for such advice. No attorney-client or confidential relationship is formed by the transmission of information between you and the National Law Review website or any of the law firms, attorneys or other professionals or organizations who include content on the National Law Review website. If you require legal or professional advice, kindly contact an attorney or other suitable professional advisor.  

Some states have laws and ethical rules regarding solicitation and advertisement practices by attorneys and/or other professionals. The National Law Review is not a law firm nor is www.NatLawReview.com  intended to be  a referral service for attorneys and/or other professionals. The NLR does not wish, nor does it intend, to solicit the business of anyone or to refer anyone to an attorney or other professional.  NLR does not answer legal questions nor will we refer you to an attorney or other professional if you request such information from us. 

Under certain state laws the following statements may be required on this website and we have included them in order to be in full compliance with these rules. The choic