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July 23, 2014

Top 5 Things Your Referral Sources Need to Know

One of the biggest mistakes that any professional who relies on referrals as a source of new clients tends to make is not educating their referral sources. 

It does you no good to ask someone to refer you if they have no idea what it is you are looking for in a new client. Here are the top 5 things your referral sources need to know:

1. What does your ideal client look like? You need to answer this question very specifically – i.e., “My ideal client is a high net worth individual ($1 million or more in assets) in their 40s who owns their own business.”

2. What should I tell them about why they should hire you? We have written frequently about your UCA – unique competitive advantage. (See my previous post on How to Create Your Unique Competitive Advantage for 2013.) Be sure your referral source understands the precise reasons why you are better than your competitors.

3. What problems do you solve? By helping your referral source understand the problems that you solve for your clients, they will know what to listen for in daily conversations and be able to recommend you to someone who mentions having a problem you solve.

4. How do you follow up with people I recommend? Your referral source needs to feel comfortable that you will follow up promptly and professionally with the people they send your way.

5. Why are referrals important to you? Let your source know that you rely on referrals as a way to build your business and how much you will appreciate their referring people to you.

© The Rainmaker Institute, All Rights Reserved

About the Author

Stephen Fairley legal marketing expert, law office management
CEO

Stephen is the CEO of The Rainmaker Institute, the nation's largest law firm marketing  company specializing in lead conversion for small law firms and solo practitioners. Over 8,000 attorneys nationwide have benefited from learning and implementing the proven Rainmaker Marketing System.

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