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Blogging: Join The Conversation

Blogging, at its best, is a conversation. The blogger has some news or a take on something or an idea or something to say and throws it out there into the blogosphere. Other folks may comment on it, or repost the thought in their own forum and add their take. And so on and so on.

That's the part I enjoy: the back and forth, the contributions from others, and those times when something I write is useful or entertaining to someone else.

So it was gratifying last week to see where Hearsay, the blog of the Westminster Law Library at the Sturm College of Law at the University of Denver mentioned The Appellate Record from among Carl Sagan's "billions and billions" of blogs in the universe, among which there are a goodly number of law blogs--or blawgs.

Hearsay cited this blog as an example of a legal blog that "strikes the delicate balance between serious . . .  and whimsical." Nice. Because that's what I've been trying to do--give useful information, but mix it up in such a way that the blog is a fun place to go and hang out. And it was especially nice to get props from the law librarians. The law library is the natural habitat of an appellate lawyer, so we have a special, nerdy kinship with the secret society of law librarians. 

The kind mention happened in the context of a discussion of how to get started blogging: 

[A]s noted by Nicole Mundt . . . “there are very few actual “rules” to legal blogging, [but] there are quite a few considerations.” One way to try and figure out what works is to read through some of the many articles and book sections now dealing specifically with this topic. Another, more interactive way, is to see what other lawyers are doing, and incorporate the best stylistic aspects of other blogs into your own.

 I agree. Blogging is a conversation, not a monologue. Becoming part of this virtual conversation is just like joining any conversation "in real life." Walk in, hang out for awhile, see what everyone is talking about, and when you're ready, find your voice:

  • Comment on what you read.
  • E-mail posts you like to colleagues.
  • Start your own blog if that's your thing.

Whichever way works best for you, join the conversation.

Copyright © 2021, Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP. All Rights Reserved.National Law Review, Volume I, Number 89
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About this Author

Kendall M. Gray, Antitrust Litigation Attorney, Andrews Kurth Law Firm
Partner

Kendall is a board certified civil appellate specialist who has represented clients in state and federal appellate courts such as the U.S. Supreme Court, the U.S. Courts of Appeal for the Fifth, Ninth, Tenth and Federal Circuits, the Supreme Court of Texas and many intermediate courts of appeal. His practice includes a variety of complex commercial, medical malpractice and toxic tort matters, as well as a particular focus in disputes involving employee benefits, managed care and ERISA. The disputes commonly require complex written and oral advocacy on such topics as ERISA preemption,...

713-220-3981
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