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THE LATEST: FTC Continues Focus on Improving Procedures for Evaluating Remedy Packages

WHAT HAPPENED

  • The FTC posted a short article indicating that after finalizing a settlement package with FTC Staff, it takes approximately four weeks for the Directors of the Bureau of Competition and the Bureau of Economics (the Directors), as well as the Commission to review the Directors’ recommendations and vote on the package.

  • The FTC explained that an expedited review is unlikely, particularly when the parties’ actions contributed to the timing concerns.

  • The FTC provided a procedure for how parties seeking an expedited review should proceed, and outlining potential scenarios that would cause the FTC to look unfavorably upon the application–g., the parties caused their predicament. Expedited review is unlikely, for example, when:

  • The parties agreed to a too-early drop dead date or a ticking agreement that fails to properly account for antitrust review; or

  • Negotiations between the parties and the FTC on custodian review drag on or the parties provide responses to requests for documents and information that are incomplete.

WHAT THIS MEANS

  • Since the Merger Remedy Report was released in 2017, both the FTC and DOJ have taken steps to improve best practices for evaluating settlement packages. In particular, greater vetting of both the remedy package and buyer is the new norm, with more extensive information requests to establish the sufficiency of the settlement package. These changes are extending the merger review process when a settlement is necessary to address antitrust enforcer concerns.

  • In addition to its revised best practices for Staff development of settlement packages, this procedural move supports the FTC’s recent focus on developing protocols that allow it to take its due time in reviewing merger remedies.

  • Last month, the FTC published a new Model Timing Agreement that, if agreed to, provides the government additional time to evaluate cases beyond the statutory period.

  • The FTC has followed that move this month by setting out protocols and timing expectations for Directors and Commissioners to vet settlement packages advanced by Staff.

  • The latest move makes clear that the extended development of settlement packages by Staff will not lead to a curtailed review of those same settlement packages by the Directors or the Commission. Antitrust enforcers continue to take the principled view that enforcers must be cautious when approving a merger with remedies and any risks in the process should be shifted to the parties where appropriate.

© 2018 McDermott Will & Emery

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About this Author

Gregory E. Heltzer, Mergers and Acquisitions Lawyer, Antitrust Attorney, McDermott Will Emery, Law Firm
Partner

Gregory E. Heltzer is a partner in the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery LLP and is based in the Firm's Washington, D.C., office.  He focuses his practice on defending mergers and acquisitions before the Federal Trade Commission, Department of Justice, state antitrust authorities and foreign competition authorities.  In addition, his practice also includes complex antitrust litigation, government investigations and antitrust counseling (e.g., advising agricultural cooperatives on the requirements of the Capper Volstead Act).

202-756-8178
Matt Evola, Associate, Mcdermott Will Emery, Washington DC, Antitrust Lawyer, regulatory, litigation, consumer protection, government investigations, white collar defense
Associate

Matt Evola focuses his practice on antitrust, regulatory and litigation matters. He has additional experience in consumer protection, government investigations, and white collar defense.

During law school, Matt was highly involved in pro bono initiatives, working with the Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless and DC Law Students in Court. He also acted as senior articles editor for the American Criminal Law Review (ACLR), actively contributing to the publication’s online blog Mens Rea, and as a legal extern to Judge James E. Boasberg of the US District Court for the District of Columbia.

202-756-8766