July 22, 2019

Mark L. Josephs

Mark Josephs focuses his practice on white collar criminal defense and government investigations; health care law, particularly pharmaceutical and medical device enforcement defense, litigation and compliance; commercial litigation; and advertising and marketing statutes and regulations affecting retailers. Mark formerly served more than 15 years as a federal prosecutor and civil litigator at the United States Department of Justice, where his prosecution and civil enforcement work often focused on high-profile health care, financial and consumer-related fraud. Mark has substantial federal court trial experience in the criminal and civil arenas and has argued more than 20 federal appeals. Mark also practiced at large law firms in Boston and Washington, DC. 

During his time at the Department of Justice, Mark received many awards for his work, including the Attorney General’s Award for Exceptional Service, the highest DOJ award; the United States Attorneys Director’s Award; and significant commendations from the Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission. Mark also has broad teaching experience, including most recently a course on White Collar Crime at the Boston University School of Law.  In addition, he frequently served as an instructor at the National Advocacy Center at the Department of Justice training center, providing instruction in trial advocacy, criminal and civil pretrial litigation, and negotiations.  

Within the community, Mark is heavily involved in the Brookline Youth Baseball organization, and he raised substantial funds for the Tenacity program by running the 2016 Boston Marathon. Tenacity is a nonprofit that uses literacy, tutoring, and tennis and other fitness activities to assist and mentor low-income students, opening the door to opportunities for post-secondary success. While living in Washington, DC, Mark spent several years as a mentor for various participants in Capitol Partners for Education, a program that assists low-income students throughout their high school education with the goal of entering a four-year college or university after graduation.

Articles in the National Law Review database by Mark L. Josephs

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