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July 25, 2014

Bad Precedent: Lawyer Censured for Buying Google Keywords for Other Lawyers and Law Firms

I thoroughly disagree with this anti-competitive, anti-consumer censure. It’s bad precedent. 

Google Keywords

I was the defense’s law firm marketing/social media expert witness in Habush vs. Cannon & Dunphy on this very issue (although the lawsuit was filed under a Wisconsin state “invasion of privacy” statute).

This is common practice online.  When you Google “Avis,” a sponsored link for Hertz shows up in the margin.  The user isn’t deceived and everyone gets more information and more choices, which is good for consumers.  It’s a strategy that helps smaller firms with smaller marketing budgets compete against big-name, big-budget firms.

This keyword-bidding strategy is certainly aggressive, but it shouldn’t be considered unethical or unprofessional; it’s simply an issue of taste, which is subjective.  We shouldn’t legislate taste.

© 2014 Fishman Marketing

About the Author

Ross Fishman, CEO Fishman Marketing
CEO

The CEO of Fishman Marketing, Ross has been called “one of the country’s leading experts on law firm marketing” by Lawyers Weekly USA. His positioning and differentiation programs help law firms dominate their markets, generating millions of dollars in additional profits. Fishman Marketing has designed over 100 campaigns, and taught over 10,000 lawyers and marketers from Istanbul to Iceland how to generate new business.

A former litigator, marketing director, and marketing partner, Ross has written more than 250 articles and received dozens of marketing awards,...

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