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April 18, 2014

Climate Change: Emerging Law of Adaptation

In the wake of Storm Sandy, adaptation to climate change is emerging as a public policy priority. Unable to rely on historic weather and temperature conditions, elected and regulatory officials, insurers and professionals serving landowners and investors are adjusting planning, design engineering and regulatory decisions to incorporate the expected impacts of climate change. That shift will have broad implications throughout the legal system, amounting to an emerging law of adaptation to climate change that is distinguishable from the emerging law of greenhouse gas controls.

For more on this, please see my article published by the American College of Environmental Lawyers, “Climate Change: Emerging Law of Adaptation.”

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About the Author

Ralph A. Child, Mintz Levin law Firm, Litigation Attorney
Member

Ralph’s practice involves regulatory strategy, advocacy, and litigation, with a strong focus on environmental policy and enforcement. Major clients include energy project developers, manufacturers, real estate developers, and public agencies, whom he advises on air, waste, contaminated site, and water pollution issues.

In 2011 and 2012, the firm received the Acquisition International Legal Award for “US Environmental Law Firm of the Year.” The awards celebrate excellence and reward firms, teams and individuals for their contribution to client service, innovation...

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