Advertisement

July 25, 2014

Getting the Deal Through: International Anti-Corruption Regulation 2013

1. International anti-corruption conventions

To which international anti-corruption conventions is your country a signatory?

  • Mexico is a party to the following anti-corruption conventions:
    • United Nations Convention against Corruption;
    • Inter-American Convention against Corruption, under the Organisation of American States (OAS); and
    • OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions.

View PDFView Media

©2014 Greenberg Traurig, LLP. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Our Corporate and Securities Practice focuses on the business objectives of our clients. We utilize the depth of our experience and resources to help clients achieve their goals notwithstanding the constantly changing business landscape. We believe that no other law firm offers corporate clients the combined benefits of local presence and global resources. We may be next door, but our reach extends to everywhere our clients want or need to be. From raising capital, to doing deals, to complying with regulations, to managing risk, to implementing best practices, our cumulative experience is...

310-586-7700

Boost: AJAX core statistics

Legal Disclaimer

You are responsible for reading, understanding and agreeing to the National Law Review's (NLR’s) and the National Law Forum LLC's  Terms of Use and Privacy Policy before using the National Law Review website. The National Law Review is a free to use, no-log in database of legal and business articles. The content and links on www.NatLawReview.com are intended for general information purposes only. Any legal analysis, legislative updates or other content and links should not be construed as legal or professional advice or a substitute for such advice. No attorney-client or confidential relationship is formed by the transmission of information between you and the National Law Review website or any of the law firms, attorneys or other professionals or organizations who include content on the National Law Review website. If you require legal or professional advice, kindly contact an attorney or other suitable professional advisor.  

Some states have laws and ethical rules regarding solicitation and advertisement practices by attorneys and/or other professionals. The National Law Review is not a law firm nor is www.NatLawReview.com  intended to be  a referral service for attorneys and/or other professionals. The NLR does not wish, nor does it intend, to solicit the business of anyone or to refer anyone to an attorney or other professional.  NLR does not answer legal questions nor will we refer you to an attorney or other professional if you request such information from us. 

Under certain state laws the following statements may be required on this website and we have included them in order to be in full compliance with these rules. The choice of a lawyer or other professional is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements. Attorney Advertising Notice: Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Statement in complian