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April 17, 2014

Lightlab Imaging v. Axsun Technologies and Volcano

A scientific or technological advantage is something to be protected. A case in the Business Litigation Session of Suffolk Superior Court demonstrates how cutthroat competition can be in the medical device industry and how the law deals with companies that disregard fair trade practices to gain an unfair advantage.

In 2007, Lightlab Imaging, a company that provides OCT medical imaging for human coronary arteries, had developed the most powerful laser in the industry. Lightlab had a cooperative relationship with Axsun to convert Axsun’s basic laser into one that could be used by Lightlab. Volcano, a competitor of Lightlab, desired a foothold in OCT technology and was well behind in the research and development of a laser with similar capabilities.

 In 2008, Volcano acquired Axsun and viewed the acquisition as a means to both advance its entry into the OCT market and impede the growth of Lightlab. However, the contract between Lightlab and Axsun contained a confidentiality and exclusivity provision which prevented Axsun from selling high performance lasers to Volcano. In connection with Volcano’s indemnification of Axsun as part of the acquisition, Axsun breached its duty of confidentiality and provided Volcano with the specifications for the high performance laser.

In 2009, Lightlab filed suit in Suffolk Superior Court and its application for a preliminary injunction was granted. A subsequent jury trial on liability returned a verdict in favor of Lightlab finding that Axsun had violated the confidentiality provision of the contract with Lightlab. The jury also found that Volcano had misappropriated Lightlab’s trade secrets and interfered with Lightlab’s contract with Axsun.

Instead of trial on damages, the parties stipulated to damages of $200,000. Subsequently, after two jury waived trials, the Court granted Defendant’s summary judgment motionfinding that Lightlab had not shown “use” of the trade secrets by Axsun and Volcano other than the due diligence use evidenced during the jury trial and therefore Lightlab had not proven misappropriation of those trade secrets.

On the 93A count, the court found that Lightlab was entitled to $200,000 in damages and because the defendant’s conduct was found to be knowing and willful, Lightlab received another $200,000 in punitive damages plus attorney fees which totaled $4,500,000.

The Supreme Judicial Court recently granted direct appellate review on whether the trial judge correctly excluded expert testimony on future lost profits on the grounds that the methodology used by the expert failed Daubert and was speculative and whether the trial judge correctly ruled that permanent injunctions may protect only specific trade secrets a defendant has already used.  The SJC is soliciting amicus briefs with argument scheduled for Fall of 2013. 

© 2014 by Raymond Law Group LLC.

About the Author

Associate

Stephen G. Troiano focuses his practice on a wide variety of business and civil litigation. Attorney Troiano began his legal career with Raymond Law Group. He represents clients in state and federal courts in civil litigation matters with a focus on business, financial, technology and insurance disputes. He is a member of the Massachusetts Bar Association, Defense Research Institute, and the Boston Bar Association.

Areas of Practice

  • Business Litigation
  • Products Liability
  • Personal Injury
  • Premises Liability
  • ...
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