Advertisement

April 24, 2014

Protecting the Individual from Data Breach

Major databreaches make the news. TJ Maxx, Barnes & Noble, and Sony all had high profile breaches. In such large scale breaches, there is a flaw that is easily exploited on a grand scale. The individual hack is rarely reported and easily overlooked.

In a follow-up to his experience, he published a piece recently, outlining why passwords cannot keep users safe. A few of the more salient points are: 1) as computing power increases, brute force attacks can become more successful; 2) users use the same logins for multiple systems; 3) answers to security questions can be easily found; and 4) convenience is a trade-off for security. If one were to follow the prevailing wisdom, each person would have to memorize 16 digit, non-dictionary, randomly generated passwords for the dozens of online accounts held, without storing those passwords anywhere. This is nearly impossible and hence systems put in place password reset mechanisms that are themselves vulnerable.

Online businesses should take a closer look at how they protect their individual clients and what information is revealed in the event a third-party gains access that could be used to disguise themselves as the client to another provider. Failure to do so may subject them to a cyberliability claim. 

© 2014 by Raymond Law Group LLC.

About the Author

Senior Associate

Jay Marshall Wolman has served as an advocate or neutral in hundreds of contested matters, appearing before state and federal courts and agencies in Massachusetts and throughout the United States. His experience includes commercial disputes, consumer class actions, and personal injury, including products liability. As a civil litigator, a substantial portion of Attorney Wolman's practice has included representation of employers and employees in workplace matters, including discrimination on the bases of race, sex, pregnancy and disability, wage and hour disputes, occupational safety...

860-266-4925

Boost: AJAX core statistics

Legal Disclaimer

You are responsible for reading, understanding and agreeing to the National Law Review's (NLR’s) and the National Law Forum LLC's  Terms of Use and Privacy Policy before using the National Law Review website. The National Law Review is a free to use, no-log in database of legal and business articles. The content and links on www.NatLawReview.com are intended for general information purposes only. Any legal analysis, legislative updates or other content and links should not be construed as legal or professional advice or a substitute for such advice. No attorney-client or confidential relationship is formed by the transmission of information between you and the National Law Review website or any of the law firms, attorneys or other professionals or organizations who include content on the National Law Review website. If you require legal or professional advice, kindly contact an attorney or other suitable professional advisor.  

Some states have laws and ethical rules regarding solicitation and advertisement practices by attorneys and/or other professionals. The National Law Review is not a law firm nor is www.NatLawReview.com  intended to be  a referral service for attorneys and/or other professionals. The NLR does not wish, nor does it intend, to solicit the business of anyone or to refer anyone to an attorney or other professional.  NLR does not answer legal questions nor will we refer you to an attorney or other professional if you request such information from us. 

Under certain state laws the following statements may be required on this website and we have included them in order to be in full compliance with these rules. The choice of a lawyer or other professional is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements. Attorney Advertising Notice: Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Statement in compliance with Texas Rules of Professional Conduct. Unless otherwise noted, attorneys are not certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, nor can NLR attest to the accuracy of any notation of Legal Specialization or other Professional Credentials.

The National Law Review - National Law Forum LLC 4700 Gilbert Ave. Suite 47 #230 Western Springs, IL 60558  Telephone  (708) 357-3317 If you would ike to contact us via email please click here.