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Technology and Security--Too Much of a Good Thing?

Hi-tech key cards, hidden cameras, metal detectors, secure and limited entrance and elevator access, and even the simplicity of the vigilance of employees and guests are many of the best practices employed at hotels today to protect its employees, guests and customers.  When travelling internationally, one can pretty easily spot signs of “perimeter security.”  Perimeter security often includes cement, metal or steel barricades that keep unwanted and unscreened traffic from entering the secured area.  It can also include security gates, intelligence-enabled camera networks, armed guards, car checks, guard dogs, lighting, height detectors and various other methods to keep the unwelcomed out of the hotel or resort area.  Once inside the “perimeter,” various other methods, both  noticeable and seemingly invisible, are utilized to keep employees and guests safe. 

In today’s world, larger properties have command centers where all video and audio is often under constant watch and review.  In an instant, video can be pulled, reviewed and sent to the appropriate authorities.  All of  this might bring back memories of your most recent visit to a casino, where the “eye in the sky” is watching your every move.  While initially you may be conscious of your every move being monitored, eventually you forget there is a camera right above you. With terrorism seemingly a real and growing threat, hotels must find a balance between allowing guests their privacy and having the ability to monitor who is on the property and what actions they may be taking. Today, it seems most guests have resigned themselves to the various additional “inconveniences” that ensure better and enhanced security, even if it means less privacy. With the economy struggling, profits down and less cash flow, hotels often find it imperative to implement these types of security measures regardless of cost. What was once seemingly an issue for only the rich and famous is now is a concern for every traveler.  The question remains, however — Can there be too much security?

©2020 Greenberg Traurig, LLP. All rights reserved. National Law Review, Volume I, Number 236
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Greenberg Traurig's International Trade & Investment Practice provides clients with guidance on global trade policies and remedies, as well as advocacy in negotiations and trade dispute proceedings. As strategic advisers, we assist clients in both sustaining and enhancing their competitiveness in the ever-changing world economy, with a focus on trade regulations and transactions, import and export controls, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), customs, intellectual property, and tariff issues. We aim to keep clients current on the many crucial facets of...

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