December 6, 2021

Volume XI, Number 340

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December 06, 2021

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Lessons Learned from Cyber Awareness Month – Part Four

In this, our last post about learnings from cyber awareness month, we focus on developing the next generation of cybersecurity experts and increasing its size. According to a study by the Center for Cyber Safety and Education, within five years there will be a shortage of 1.8 million data security workers. This means companies will find it increasingly difficult to hire and retain qualified employees to protect their data systems. Cyber Awareness Month included programs encouraging students and others to explore jobs in cybersecurity, and emphasized programs such as the National Cyber Collegiate Defense Competition and the U.S. Cyber Challenge.

Putting It Into PracticeIt may seem on first blush that companies cannot do much about the coming dearth of cybersecurity experts, but that is not correct. Companies can:

  • Offer internships for students in the cybersecurity field. This will not only give you access to the latest learning in the area, but also create relationships with individuals who could become new and valuable employees down the line. Internships can become an inside track for an employer to secure valuable talent.

  • Support (financially and otherwise) employees who wish to pursue education in the cybersecurity field. It will not only increase morale and employee loyalty, but could also give you access to highly valued skills and knowledge via an already-known and valued employee.

Copyright © 2021, Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP.National Law Review, Volume VII, Number 331
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About this Author

Jonathan E. Meyer, Sheppard Mullin, International Trade Lawyer, Encryption Technology Attorney
Partner

Jon Meyer is a partner in the Government Contracts, Investigations & International Trade Practice Group in the firm's Washington, D.C. office.

Mr. Meyer was most recently Deputy General Counsel at the United States Department of Homeland Security, where he advised the Secretary, Deputy Secretary, General Counsel, Chief of Staff and other senior leaders on law and policy issues, such as cyber security, airline security, high technology, drones, immigration reform, encryption, and intelligence law. He also oversaw all litigation at DHS,...

202-747-1920
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