December 14, 2017

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Preparing for the Repeal of Cook County’s Beverage Tax: Requesting Credits and Refunds

Earlier this fall, the Cook County Board voted to repeal its constitutionally suspect, politically unpopular one cent per ounce sweetened beverage tax (Tax). The short-lived Tax will expire at the end of the County’s fiscal year on November 30, 2017.

Having been tasked with implementing the Tax, the Cook County Department of Revenue (Department) is now charged with unwinding it. Distributors and retailers who have paid the Tax are entitled to credits or refunds on their unsold inventory at month’s end. The Department recently issued guidance on the credit/refund procedure.

Retailers that have paid Tax to their distributors may claim a credit/refund from their distributors for Tax paid on their unsold inventory by completing the Department form entitled “2017 Sweetened Beverage Retailer Inventory Credit Request Form and Schedule A.” Retailers should complete and submit the form to their distributors, not the Department.

Distributors must file a final Tax return with the Department on or before December 20 (Final Return). To the extent a distributor already has refunded or credited Tax to its retailers, the distributor may claim a credit for the amount refunded on the “other deductions” line of its Final Return. Distributors must file the Department’s standard refund application, found on the Department’s website, to claim refunds for amounts refunded or credited to retailers after December 20. The Department has issued a new form (the “Sweetened Beverage Tax Distributor Credit Form Schedule”) to be submitted by distributors to the Department in support of any credit or refund claims. The form requires distributors to identify the retailers to which it has provided credits/refunds and the amounts thereof.

Retailers who self-remit the Tax may take a credit on their Final Return with supporting documentation. In addition, retailers that have unsold inventory as of December 1, on which they previously remitted floor tax, may obtain a refund of the floor tax through the Department’s standard refund procedure.

Practice Notes:

  1. To the extent possible, Taxpayers should take advantage of the opportunity to claim a credit on their Final Returns in order to avoid the time and expense associated with the County’s standard refund procedure.

  2. Since the Tax was repealed, enthusiasm has waned for various Illinois House Bills (HB 4082-84) proposing to limit the authority of localities to impose beverage taxes. It’s difficult to predict whether the bills will be enacted.

  3. However, the State of Michigan has passed legislation, signed into law by Governor Snyder on October 26, 2017, which prohibits municipalities from levying local taxes on food or beverages.

© 2017 McDermott Will & Emery

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About this Author

 McDermott Will Emery Law Firm, Lauren A. Ferrante, Tax Attorney
Associate

Lauren A. Ferrante is an associate in the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery LLP and is based in the Firm’s Chicago office. She focuses her practice on state and local taxation. Lauren represents taxpayers at all stages of state and local controversy disputes, at the audit, administrative, and judicial levels. She also assists taxpayers with planning, transactional, and compliance matters with respect to various state and local taxes, including income and franchise taxes, sales and use taxes, gross receipts taxes, and other miscellaneous taxes.

Lauren regularly speaks on state...

312-984-2053
Mary Kay McCalla Martire, McDermott, local tax disputes lawyer, Internal Audits Attorney
Partner

Mary Kay McCalla Martire focuses her practice on state and local tax disputes. She helps clients with audits, tax-related litigation, letter rulings and settlement conferences. Mary Kay has experience resolving disputes involving income, sales and use, utility and telecommunications taxes, as well as premium and retaliatory tax.

Mary Kay has an extensive litigation background in state and federal court, as well as administrative tribunals. She has particular experience in the defense of qui tam (whistleblower) claims filed in the state tax arena, and has won the dismissal of many Illinois False Claims Act cases. Mary Kay played a key role in most of the reported decisions issued by the Illinois appellate court in this area over the last decade. She also has experience defending clients against class action and consumer fraud claims.

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