October 22, 2021

Volume XI, Number 295

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Grant B. Osborne

Grant's practice experience of more than 30 years encompasses a wide range of issues that arise in employment and labor law.  He provides counsel to clients in the health care, financial, hospitality, construction, business services, employee staffing, and non-profit sectors.  Grant represents clients in state and federal courts as well as administrative agencies.  He regularly advises employers of all sizes and litigates civil cases regarding all forms of employment discrimination, wrongful discharge, unlawful retaliation, contractual issues, personnel policies and practices, and wage and hour issues. 

Grant also has advised and represented employers with respect to their rights and obligations arising under laws pertaining to collective bargaining and labor unions.  He is a frequent lecturer regarding all aspects of the employment relationship that arise under numerous federal and state laws, and often represents employers before the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the National Labor Relations Board, and federal and state "wage and hour" agencies.  He also serves as a mediator and is certified by the North Carolina Dispute Resolution Commission.  Grant served as the Chairman of the North Carolina Bar Association's Labor and Employment Law Section (from 2015 to 2016).

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Articles in the National Law Review database by Grant B. Osborne

The National Review named Grant B. Osborne as a Go-To Thought Leader for his timely contributions on labor and employment law developments, with a specific emphasis on COVID-19 employment guidance, and the impact of the FFCRA (Families First Coronavirus Response Act) and the DOL regulations interpreting the FFCRA.  Mr. Osborne’s thought leadership is written with an eye to current events, such as best practices regarding political speech in the workplace,  how businesses should respond when customers and clients refuse to wear masks, and guidance on various state laws concerning employers’ Coronavirus mandates. 

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