January 28, 2023

Volume XIII, Number 28

Robert Maddox

In the past decade, Robert Maddox handled more national/multi-state state attorneys general investigations and related consent judgments than any attorney in the United States.

His work involves representing clients before the CFPB, DOJ, EOUST, OCC, FRB, HUD, SEC and multiple state regulatory agencies, including banking, finance and insurance agencies.

With Bradley’s national competitive fee advantage, he continued the firm’s representation post-consent judgment on most matters to handle redress of business systems, internal and external reporting, and account remediation – and still provides board training, compliance, and litigation representation to many of those same clients.

Robert stands behind his work product and advice and supports clients through challenging times and then celebrates their business successes.

Crisis Management: Every crisis is relative – relative to a company’s history, reputation, current PR environment and regulatory/litigation burden. Reputational matters may have de minimis financial impact but may be more important than multibillion-dollar negotiations. Robert handles both extremes and works with management and legal to be part of many crisis management team solutions.

Once selected to support and suggest strategy to a business in crisis, and then work through the internal pressure, external inquiry, sunrise telephone conferences, late night meetings, 24-hour sessions, regulatory/investor data demands and evolving PR strategies, Robert forms professional bonds and friendships that, thus far, have lasted a lifetime.

Negotiations: From complex commercial real estate transactions to regulatory examinations, Robert’s working philosophy is focused on education and overcoming any potential preconceived judgments and misperceptions held by the counterparty. This approach requires a diligence in understanding the client’s business and approach to the transaction/issue, then turning to the counterparty with the goal to educate, listen and negotiate a resolution.

 

 

 

 

Articles in the National Law Review database by Robert Maddox

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