July 4, 2020

Volume X, Number 186

July 03, 2020

Subscribe to Latest Legal News and Analysis

July 02, 2020

Subscribe to Latest Legal News and Analysis

July 01, 2020

Subscribe to Latest Legal News and Analysis

Congressional Hearing regarding proposed financial regulation scheduled for September 7

Congress is back in session and this Thursday, September 7, the House Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit will hold a one-panel hearing entitled “Legislative Proposals for a More Efficient Federal Financial Regulatory Regime.”  The hearing will take place at 10:00 a.m. in room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building, and will involve the following witnesses:

  • Anne Fortney, Partner Emerita, Hudson Cook LLP

  • Charles Tuggle, Executive Vice President and General Counsel, First Horizon National Corporation

  • Thomas Quaadman, Executive Vice President, Center for Capital Markets Competitiveness, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

  • Chi Chi Wu, Staff Attorney, National Consumer Law Center

The witnesses will testify on the following six bills:

H.R. 1849 (Rep. Trott), the “Practice of Law Technical Clarification Act of 2017

This bill seeks to protect attorney debt collectors by amending the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) and the Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010.  A “debt collector” is currently defined under the FDCPA as “any person who uses any instrumentality of interstate commerce or the mails in any business the principal purpose of which is the collection of any debts, or who regularly collects or attempts to collect, directly or indirectly, debts owed or due or asserted to be owed or due another.”  Courts have interpreted this definition to cover attorneys who collect debts as a matter of course for their clients, or who collect debts as a principal part of their law practice.  Moreover, some courts have held that representations made by an attorney in court filings during the course of debt-collection litigation are actionable under the FDCPA, even when they are addressed to a consumer’s attorney and not the consumer himself.  Under the proposal, the FDCPA’s definition of “debt collector” would exclude law firms and licensed attorneys who (1) serve, file, or convey formal legal pleadings, discovery requests, or other documents pursuant to the applicable rules of civil procedure; or who (2) communicate in, or at the direction of, a court of law or in depositions or settlement conferences, in connection with a pending legal action to collect a debt on behalf of a client.

The bill would also provide that the Consumer Financial Protections Bureau (CFPB) cannot exercise supervisory or enforcement authority over attorneys engaged in the practice of law who do not offer or provide consumer financial products or services.  The CFPB has brought a number of enforcement actions against attorneys and law firms engaged in allegedly illegal debt collection practices.

H.R. 2359 (Rep. Loudermilk), the “FCRA Liability Harmonization Act

This bill would amend the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) to limit statutory damages in FCRA class actions to the lesser of $500,000 or one percent of the net worth of the defendant. This proposal would also eliminate punitive damages that can be awarded under the FCRA.  The FCRA currently permits an award of punitive damages, and has no cap on statutory damages for individual or class actions.

H.R. 3312 (Rep. Luetkemeyer), the “Systemic Risk Designation Improvement Act of 2017

This bill seeks to amend the definition of “systemically important financial institutions” that are subject to enhanced regulatory standards under Title I of The Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank).  Currently, Dodd-Frank requires each bank holding company deemed “too big to fail” by virtue of total consolidated assets of $50 billion or more to, among other things, prepare and provide to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the Federal Reserve a resolution plan, or “living will,” for its rapid and orderly resolution under the U.S. bankruptcy code. The bill would remove the $50 billion asset threshold from Dodd-Frank and instead add a measurement approach based on “systemic indicator scores.”  Under this approach, only bank holding companies that are identified as global systemically important banks (G-SIB) would be subject to the Federal Reserve Board’s enhanced supervision and prudential standards.

H.R. ____ (Rep. Royce), the “Facilitating Access to Credit Act

This proposal seeks to exempt an Authorized Credit Services Provider (ACSP) from the Credit Repair Organizations Act (CROA) to the extent it provides credit and identity protection or credit education services, as defined in the bill.  The CROA currently covers a “credit repair organization,” which is defined to include anyone who provides a service, “in return for the payment of money or other valuable consideration, for the express or implied purpose of— (i) improving any consumer’s credit record, credit history, or credit rating; or (ii) providing advice or assistance to any consumer with regard to any activity or service described in clause (i).” While originally aimed at credit repair scams, this broad definition has been read to cover credit monitoring products offered by consumer reporting agencies.

The bill seeks to narrow this definition by setting forth a process to apply to become an ACSP with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), which if approved by the FTC, would allow the ACSP to provide the defined services without being subject to the CROA and without being subject to state laws and regulations concerning a credit repair organization.  State laws and regulations related to unfair or deceptive acts or practices in marketing products or services would still apply.  ACSPs that violate any of the eligibility criteria provided in the bill would be subject to retroactive revocation of status to the time of the conduct, thereby allowing the FTC to then enforce violations of the CROA.

H.R. ____ (Rep. Tenney), the “Community Institution Mortgage Relief Act of 2017

This bill would amend the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act of 1974 (RESPA) and would direct the CFPB to reduce loan servicing and escrow account administration requirements imposed on certain loan servicers.  First, the proposal would require the CFPB to exempt from certain escrow or impound requirements a loan that is secured by a first lien on a consumer’s principal dwelling if the loan is held by a creditor with assets of $50 billion or less.  The statute does not currently provide an exemption for “smaller creditors” based on asset size.  Second, the CFPB would need to provide either exemptions to, or adjustments from, certain RESPA requirements for servicers of 30,000 or fewer mortgage loans.  The current statute provides no such threshold or exemption for “small servicers of mortgage loans.”

H.R. ____ (Rep. Hill), the “TRID Improvement Act of 2017

This bill would expand the period under RESPA and TILA in which a creditor is allowed to cure a good-faith violation on a loan estimate or closing disclosure from 60 to 210 days after consummation.  The proposal would also amend RESPA to allow for the calculation of a simultaneous issue discount when disclosing title insurance premiums.  Presently under RESPA, a lender may disclose a simultaneous issue discount by disclosing the full premium rate and by taking the full owner’s title insurance premium, adding the simultaneous issuance premium for the lender’s coverage, and then deducting the full premium for lender’s coverage.  This calculation method renders inaccurate disclosures of the lender’s and owner’s individual title insurance premiums even though the sum will equal the amount actually charged to the consumer when paying for both policies.

Congress is also currently considering government funding legislation, raising the debt ceiling, and tax reform so these bills may not receive close attention.  We will report back on the hearing and provide updates.

Copyright © by Ballard Spahr LLPNational Law Review, Volume VII, Number 249

TRENDING LEGAL ANALYSIS


About this Author

Pavitra Bacon, Ballard Spahr Washington DC office, consumer financial services, regulatory compliance  class action litigation, government enforcement matters attorney
Associate

Pavitra Bacon counsels providers of consumer financial services, including banks, on regulatory compliance matters, and has successfully represented such providers in class action litigation and government enforcement matters. She advises clients on multifaceted regulatory issues related to student lending, mortgage origination and servicing, lender-placed insurance, information privacy, and credit cards. Her practice focuses on federal and state consumer protection laws, including the Truth-in-Lending Act (TILA); the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA); the Equal Credit Opportunity...

202.661.2295