October 28, 2020

Volume X, Number 302

Advertisement

October 27, 2020

Subscribe to Latest Legal News and Analysis

October 26, 2020

Subscribe to Latest Legal News and Analysis

Crossing State Lines: Maine Exempts Massachusetts from Travel Quarantine & Other Updates

As states continue to track the spread of COVID-19 and its impact on interstate travel, we wanted to provide an update to the quarantine requirements in New England. With Massachusetts now on Maine’s exempted states list, Rhode Island remains the only state in the region without full reciprocity, and is still subject to quarantine requirements in Connecticut, Maine, and Massachusetts.

CONNECTICUT

Rhode Island is the only state in New England not exempt from the Connecticut’s quarantine requirements. Exempt states outside of New England include California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maryland, Michigan, New York, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Oregon, Washington (state), Washington, D.C., Wyoming, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

MAINE

Effective September 23, 2020, Massachusetts residents will no longer have to quarantine for 14 days when traveling to Maine. Currently, Rhode Island is the only New England state not exempt from Maine’s quarantine requirement. New York and New Jersey are also exempt.

MASSACHUSETTS

States exempt from the quarantine or testing requirement still include all of New England except for Rhode Island, as well as Colorado, New York, New Jersey, Oregon, Washington (state), and Wyoming.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Although there are no formal restrictions in place, New Hampshire asks anyone, including residents, coming into the state from areas outside New England to self-quarantine for a two-week period, regardless of their mode of transportation. However, the state’s universal guidelines, applicable generally to all businesses, requires employers to prohibit any employee from entering the workplace prior to completion of a 14-day self-quarantine upon entry or return to New Hampshire from any state outside of New England except for essential travel.

RHODE ISLAND

States not considered hotspots and exempt from the 14-day quarantine requirement include all of New England, Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Washington (state), and West Virginia.

VERMONT

Travelers from certain counties with low rates of active cases do not need to quarantine when they arrive in Vermont. Each Tuesday, Vermont updates its map identifying quarantine and non-quarantine counties throughout the Northeast including New England, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Washington, D.C., Virginia; and West Virginia.

©2020 Pierce Atwood LLP. All rights reserved.National Law Review, Volume X, Number 268
Advertisement

TRENDING LEGAL ANALYSIS

Advertisement
Advertisement

About this Author

Kathleen Hamann White Collar Attorney Pierce Atwood Washington, DC
Partner

Kathleen Hamann is an internationally recognized authority in the field of white collar enforcement and compliance matters. Drawing on her nearly 20 years of service to the federal government, in roles at the US Department of Justice and Department of State, Kathleen helps clients navigate the complexities of U.S. and transnational criminal liability and multijurisdictional government investigations.

Since returning to private practice, Kathleen has represented clients in a number of transnational matters, conducting global risk assessments, designing compliance programs, and...

202-530-6409
Sarah Remes Employment Lawyer Pierce Atwood Law Firm
Associate

Sarah Remes represents clients in complex commercial litigation, including class actions, employment-related disputes, and internal investigations.

Prior to joining Pierce Atwood, Sarah was an associate at a litigation boutique in Boston. During law school, Sarah was a judicial intern for Massachusetts Appeals Court Justice Judd. J. Carhart. She was also the articles editor for the Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law and a member of the Pro Bono Honor Society. Prior to law school, Sarah worked in risk management and internal audit at a Boston-area bank.

617-488-8149
Advertisement
Advertisement