December 6, 2021

Volume XI, Number 340

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December 03, 2021

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Dulles CBP Officers Seize more than $1 Million in Counterfeit Consumer Goods

STERLING, Va. – Shipments with a voluminous amount of counterfeit consumer goods are usually transported in maritime cargo, so it was a bit surprising when Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers encountered two women who arrived at Washington Dulles International Airport recently from Qatar with 806 counterfeit items packed into 21 checked suitcases.

The 806 items, which included fake designer brand jewelry, watches, clothes, shoes, sunglasses and handbags, under the brand names Christian Dior, Dolce & Gabbana, Fendi, Gucci, Hermes, Prada, and Versace, among others, would have had a combined manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $1,065,779, if authentic.

Even the 21 suitcases that the fake goods were packed into were counterfeit.

The two women, U.S. lawful permanent residents living in Virginia, arrived from Doha, Qatar on August 8. A CBP officer referred the women to a secondary examination area to complete a formal entry for the commercial goods in their baggage.

CBP officers then suspected that the goods were counterfeit and detained the goods for a more thorough inspection. Officers inventoried 806 items and submitted documentation of the inventory to CBP’s Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising (CPMM), and the Apparel, Footwear, and Textile (AFT) Centers of Excellence and Expertise.

CBP’s Centers of Excellence and Expertise, which are the agency’s trade experts, worked with trademark holders and by September 27 determined that all 806 pieces were counterfeit. CBP officers completed the seizure on September 29.

“This might be one of the most uniquely large counterfeit goods seizures that Customs and Border Protection officers have seen in regular passenger baggage,” said John Jurgutis, Acting Area Port Director for the Area Port of Washington, D.C. “We know that the illicit trade in counterfeit consumer goods steals revenue from American businesses, threatens consumers with potentially unsafe products, and funds transnational criminal organizations, and CBP officers will continue to strike back at this illicit enterprise while protecting American consumers.”

CBP protects businesses and consumers every day through an aggressive Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) enforcement program. During fiscal year 2020, CBP reported 26,503 counterfeit goods seizures worth an estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of over $1.3 billion, in the goods were authentic. That comes out to about $3.6 million in counterfeit goods seizures every day. Read CBP’s Intellectual Property Seizure Report for more Fiscal Year 2020 IPR stats and analysis.

CBP's border security mission is led at ports of entry by CBP officers from the Office of Field Operations.

CBP officers screen international travelers and cargo and search for illicit narcotics, unreported currency, weapons, counterfeit consumer goods, prohibited agriculture, and other illicit products that could potentially harm the American public, U.S. businesses, and our nation’s safety and economic vitality. Learn more what CBP accomplished during "A Typical Day" in 2020.

Please visit CBP Ports of Entry to learn more about how CBP’s Office of Field Operations secures our nation’s borders. Learn more about CBP at www.CBP.gov.

Follow the Director of CBP’s Baltimore Field Office on Twitter at @DFOBaltimore and on Instagram at @dfobaltimore for breaking news, current events, human interest stories and photos.

© Copyright U.S. Customs and Border ProtectionNational Law Review, Volume XI, Number 297
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About this Author

U.S. Customs and Border Protection  dept of homeland security

On March 1, 2003, U.S. Customs and Border Protection became the nation’s first comprehensive border security agency with a focus on maintaining the integrity of the nation’s boundaries and ports of entry.

Before CBP, security, compliance and facilitation of international travel and trade were conducted by multiple organizations. The consolidation of these roles and responsibilities allowed CBP to develop seamless security procedures while ensuring compliance with the nation’s immigration, health, and international...

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