September 22, 2021

Volume XI, Number 265

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September 20, 2021

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Election Results: New Data Privacy and Security Laws

Although the Presidential race is unconfirmed at the time of this writing, there are several data privacy and security laws to put on your radar following the election this week.

Here is a brief list of laws that passed that we are aware of so far. We will provide more information as news breaks, but in this ever-changing area, we want to alert you to some important changes in the state law landscape following the election.

California’s Prop 24

 This proposition updates California’s CCPA, now referred to as California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA). In addition to other provisions (link Deb’s blogs from today and last week here), from a compliance perspective, it establishes a first-of-its-kind enforcement agency, the California Privacy Protection Agency, which will oversee enforcement of CPRA, and further establishes fines and penalties for violation of the law. The law goes into effect on January 1, 2023, for all data that are collected starting on January 1, 2022. Keep this one on your compliance radar and we will update you further.

Maine Approves Referendum on Limiting Use of Facial Recognition Technology 

Maine voters approved Referendum Question B, which strengthens the ban on the use of facial recognition surveillance technology by police and public officials. 

Massachusetts Votes in Favor of Ballot Question 1 

Massachusetts voted in favor of Ballot Question 1, which would require car manufacturers to equip vehicles using telematic systems with an open-access data platform starting with the model year 2022.

A detailed analysis of Ballot Question 1 is here.

Michigan Amends Constitution to Require Warrant for Access to Electronic Data

In Michigan, it appears that voters have approved an amendment to the state constitution to require search warrants for law enforcement to access electronic data and communications. The measure amends that part of the constitution that provides for the protection against unreasonable search and seizure.

Staying abreast of new state laws and regulations is a complex process for those charged with compliance adherence. We will continue to update you on the most significant changes to assist you in your compliance efforts.

Copyright © 2021 Robinson & Cole LLP. All rights reserved.National Law Review, Volume X, Number 310
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About this Author

Linn F. Freedman, Robinson Cole Law Firm, Cybersecurity and Litigation Law Attorney, Providence
Partner

Linn Freedman practices in data privacy and security law, cybersecurity, and complex litigation. She provides guidance on data privacy and cybersecurity compliance to a full range of public and private clients across all industries, such as construction, education, health care, insurance, manufacturing, real estate, utilities and critical infrastructure, marine, and charitable organizations. Linn is a member of the firm's Business Litigation Group and chairs its Data Privacy + Cybersecurity Team. She is also a member of the Financial Services Cyber-Compliance Team (CyFi ...

401-709-3353
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