June 18, 2019

June 18, 2019

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June 17, 2019

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Illinois Legislature Approves Bill to Raise Minimum Wage to $15.00, Sends to Governor for Signature

(Update from an earlier post on Illinois Minimum Wage)

The Illinois legislature has now passed the “Lifting Up Illinois Working Families Act,” under which the state’s minimum wage will increase to $15.00 per hour over the next six years. Governor J.B. Pritzker has stated that he intends to sign the bill into law prior to his first budget speech on February 20th.

Under the new law, the hourly minimum wage will increase to $9.25 on January 1, 2020; to $10.00 on July 1, 2020; to $11.00 on January 1, 2021; and an additional $1.00 per hour each January 1st thereafter, until reaching $15.00 on January 1, 2025. Employers may pay a slightly lower wage rate to employees under the age of 18, provided they work less than 650 hours a year. The law also provides a tax credit to those employers with less than 50 full-time-equivalent employees.

In addition to increasing the minimum wage, the law increases the remedies available to employees who are paid less than minimum wage. Employees will now be able to recover triple the amount of the underpayment; reasonable attorney’s fees and costs; and an additional payment (effectively, interest) of 5% of the amount of the underpayment for each month it remains unpaid. In addition, an employer that violates the minimum wage provisions will have to pay a statutory penalty of $1,500 to the Illinois Department of Labor Wage Theft Enforcement Fund, as well as a penalty of $100 per affected employee if it fails to maintain proper payroll records.

Jackson Lewis P.C. © 2019

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About this Author

Thomas Berry, Human Resources, Employment, Management Attorney, Jackson Lewis, Law firm
Principal

Thomas E. Berry, Jr. is a Principal in the St. Louis, Missouri, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. Mr. Berry’s practice is exclusively focused on representing management before state, federal or local administrative agencies as well as before both state and federal courts throughout the country. His practice is national in scope – he has represented employers in legal proceedings in over twenty different states. Mr. Berry has extensive litigation experience which permits him to effectively counsel and advise clients on a variety of employment related issues in order to ensure...

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Neil Dishman, Jackson Lewis, employee dispute attorney, personnel decisions legal counsel, litigation lawyer, workplace discrimination law
Principal

Neil H. Dishman is a Principal in the Chicago, Illinois, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. His business is helping employers prevent and resolve disputes with their employees.

Mr. Dishman helps employers reduce risk and minimize legal costs by giving advice on difficult personnel decisions before litigation ensues. When litigation is unavoidable, he helps employers protect their assets and reputations by vigorously and efficiently defending them from employee lawsuits. Mr. Dishman counsels and defends employers on a wide spectrum of issues, including race, sex, age, religion, national origin, disability and sexual-orientation discrimination; sexual harassment; retaliatory discharge; Family and Medical Leave; and wage-hour compliance. He assists employers in a wide variety of industries, with particular experience in the property management, non-profit, manufacturing, and health-care fields.

Mr. Dishman has garnered the accolades of his peers for his work in advising and defending employers. He is the author of publications on employment law, civil procedure, and practice development. In addition to his published works, Mr. Dishman is committed to educating the human-resources community on key issues in employment law. To that end, he is a frequent speaker on employment-law topics, having given over twenty seminars to various business groups in just the last two years. Mr. Dishman has also served as a guest lecturer at Wheaton College and Oakton Community College, and he was interviewed on WDCB Public Radio (90.9 FM) about trends in wage-hour litigation.

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