November 27, 2022

Volume XII, Number 331

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Labor Board Asks: Retain, Modify, or Rescind ‘Quickie Election’ Rules?

A Request for Information regarding the  representation regulations (at 29 CFR parts 101 and 102) will be published on December 13, 2017, the National Labor Relations Board has announced. The RFI will seek input on the 2014 amendments to representation case procedures that reduced the opportunities for employers to communicate with their employees about union issues between the filing of a representation petition and the NLRB-conducted election.

The amendments, which took effect on April 14, 2015, allowed union organizing to move at an accelerated pace by, among other things, significantly reducing the time between the filing of a representation petition and the election from an average of approximately six weeks to an average of 23 days. Other provisions create substantial burdens on employers by requiring, within seven days, the submission of an onerous Statement of Position addressing all potential bargaining unit issues, the provision of copious amounts of information regarding potential voters, and deferring critical election issues, such as supervisory status issues, until after the election is held.

While the Board’s stated purpose in adopting the 2014 rules was to simplify representation-case procedures, the rules placed substantial pressure on employers to make critical decisions and produce important documentation within tight deadlines. By compressing the time period between the filing of the petition and the election, the rules also eliminated much of an employer’s ability to communicate with its employees about unionization issues.

From December 13, 2017, through February 12, 2018, the NLRB will allow interested parties to respond to three questions about the current rule:

(1) Should the 2014 Election Rule be retained without change?

(2) Should the 2014 Election Rule be retained with modifications? If so, what should be modified?

(3) Should the 2014 Election Rule be rescinded? If so, should the Board revert to the Representation Election Regulations that were in effect prior to the 2014 Election Rule’s adoption, or should the Board make changes to the prior Representation Election Regulations? If the Board should make changes to the prior Representation Election Regulations, what should be changed?

Before April 14, 2015, elections traditionally were conducted approximately six weeks after the filing of a representation petition. A return to this longer period would afford employers a much more reasonable amount of time to communicate with their employees about unionization. In addition, employers would be able to focus on providing critical information to employees about their rights and the advantages and disadvantages of unionization.

It remains to be seen what action, if any, the Board will take after reviewing the answers it receives. Nevertheless, its RFI should be cause for optimism among employers.

Jackson Lewis P.C. © 2022National Law Review, Volume VII, Number 346
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About this Author

Ian B. Bogaty, Jackson Lewis, labor arbitration lawyer, contract administration attorney
Principal

Ian B. Bogaty is a Principal in the Long Island, New York, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. Since joining the firm in 2004, he has practiced in traditional labor law areas such as collective bargaining, labor arbitration, contract administration and representation and unfair labor practice proceedings before the National Labor Relations Board and improper practices proceedings before the Public Employment Relations Board.

Mr. Bogaty also regularly counsels clients in the development and completion of preventative labor and...

631-247-4615
Howard Bloom, Jackson Lewis, labor union attorney, unfair practice investigations lawyer, employment legal counsel, bargaining law
Principal

Howard M. Bloom is a Principal in the Boston, Massachusetts, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. He has practiced labor and employment law representing exclusively employers for more than 36 years.

Mr. Bloom counsels clients in a variety of industries on labor law issues. He trains and advises executives, managers and supervisors on union awareness and positive employee relations, and assists employers in connection with union card-signing efforts, traditional union representation and corporate campaigns, and union decertification...

617-367-0025
Jonathan J. Spitz, Jackson Lewis Law Firm, Labor Employment Attorney, Atlanta
Shareholder

Jonathan J. Spitz is a Principal in the Atlanta, Georgia, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. He is Co-Leader of the firm’s Labor and Preventive Practices Group.

Mr. Spitz lectures extensively, conducts management training, and advises clients with respect to legislative and regulatory initiatives, corporate strategies, business ethics, social media issues and the changing regulatory landscape. He understands the practical and operational needs of corporate America, helping design pragmatic strategies to minimize risk and maximize performance. He has represented...

404-586-1835
Philip B. Rosen Jackson Lewis  Preventive Practices Lawyer & Collective Bargaining Attorney
Principal

Philip B. Rosen is a Principal in the New York City, New York, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. He is a member of the firm's Board of Directors and co-leads the firm's Labor and Preventive Practices Group. He joined the firm in 1979 and served as Managing Partner of the New York City office from 1989 to 2009.

Mr. Rosen lectures extensively, conducts management training, and advises clients with respect to legislative and regulatory initiatives, corporate strategies, business ethics, social media, reorganizations and reductions-...

212-545-4000
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