October 25, 2021

Volume XI, Number 298

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October 25, 2021

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A New Book Of Exodus

And these are the names of California companies who came out of California . . . .  The California Policy Center, which describes itself as "an educational non-profit working for the prosperity of all Californians by eliminating public-sector barriers to freedom", has published  The California Book of Exoduses.  The "book" lists some 143 companies and individuals that have announced departures from the Golden State.   Many companies, such as Tesla, Inc. and Hewlett Packard Enterprise, have set their eyes on Texas.  However, many other states, including Colorado, Florida, Nevada, and North Carolina, are also on the list.  While the list is dispiriting, it does not appear to be complete.

The book's name is a misnomer - it is just a spreadsheet.  The plural form of "exodus" also caught my eye.  The most famous exodus, of course, was that of sons of Israel from Egypt.  This is recounted in the second book of the Torah (or in Greek, the Pentateuch).  In Hebrew, the book is called Shemoth (in Hebrew, שְׁמוֹת‎), which is the plural of the word Shem, meaning names.  Thus, the book begins by listing the names of the sons of Israel who came to Mitzrayim, which means Egypt or confinement.  The book's Greek name is Exodos (Εξοδοσ), which is derived from the Greek words, ἐκ (meaning from or out of) and ὁδός (meaning road or way).  The English name, Exodus, is a Latinization of the Greek name.  This creates a bit of a puzzle concerning the proper plural form.  In Greek, the plural would be Exodoi (Εξοδοι).  In Latin, the plural form depends upon whether it is a second or fourth declension noun.   If Exodus is a second declension noun, the plural would be Exodi (like cactus and cacti).  If it is a fourth declension noun, the plural form would be Exodus in Latin (with a long ū).  In English, the plural form of Latin fourth declension nouns is formed by adding es (e.g., prospectus and prospectuses).  The plural form of "Exodus" is rarely seen, but the California Policy Center has apparently decided that it is in the fourth declension.

© 2010-2021 Allen Matkins Leck Gamble Mallory & Natsis LLP National Law Review, Volume XI, Number 284
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About this Author

Keith Paul Bishop, Corporate Transactions Lawyer, finance securities attorney, Allen Matkins Law Firm
Partner

Keith Bishop works with privately held and publicly traded companies on federal and state corporate and securities transactions, compliance, and governance matters. He is highly-regarded for his in-depth knowledge of the distinctive corporate and regulatory requirements faced by corporations in the state of California.

While many law firms have a great deal of expertise in federal or Delaware corporate law, Keith’s specific focus on California corporate and securities law is uncommon. A former California state regulator of securities and financial institutions, Keith has decades of...

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