October 28, 2020

Volume X, Number 302

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October 26, 2020

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New Jersey Reconsiders Financial Transaction Tax

A troubling New Jersey financial transaction tax proposal, which appeared to be gaining in popularity over the last few months, has reportedly been left out of the 2021 budget deal Governor Phil Murphy struck with legislative leaders last week. The decision to drop the transaction tax from the deal came days after the Wall Street Journal reported that prominent stock exchanges with data centers in New Jersey were prepared to exit the state if the tax plan was adopted. Although the financial transaction tax may be off the table this round, Governor Murphy still likes the idea and we are hearing that the concept is not permanently dead.

S2902/A4402 would impose a financial transaction tax on persons or entities that process 10,000 or more financial transactions through electronic infrastructure located in New Jersey during the year. According to the bill, there are reportedly billions of financial transactions processed daily, and many of those are processed through infrastructure located in New Jersey. The tax would be a quarter of a cent per financial transaction processed in the state and be levied on the processor.

Many well-known New York stock exchanges maintain their electronic infrastructure in New Jersey and have expressed their intention to leave New Jersey before becoming subject to the tax, which they argue harms not only their customers but also ordinary investors because the costs of the tax are passed down from the exchanges to everyone else in the market. Many US stock exchanges already maintain backup facilities in the Midwest. An industry-wide effort to test those Midwestern facilities is scheduled for September 26 to demonstrate their preparedness, and willingness, to relocate.

New Jersey’s financial transaction tax proposal may drive data center businesses out of the state before it is even adopted or formally considered by the state legislature, which teaches a valuable lesson: In a post-coronavirus world, states looking to make up billions in deficits by aggressively taxing businesses that survived the economic crisis risk finding out just how mobile businesses have become.

© 2020 McDermott Will & EmeryNational Law Review, Volume X, Number 266
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About this Author

Stephen P. Kranz Lawyer McDermott Will
Partner

Stephen P. Kranz is a partner in the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery LLP and is based in the Firm’s Washington, D.C., office.  He engages in all forms of taxpayer advocacy, including audit defense and litigation, legislative monitoring, and the formation and leadership of taxpayer coalitions.  Steve is at the forefront of state and local tax issues, including developments arising in the world of cloud computing and digital goods and services.  He assists clients in understanding planning opportunities and compliance obligations for all states and all tax types. ...

202-756-8180
Alysse McLoughlin attorney state and local tax matters, financial services companies MCDermott Will New York
Partner

Alysse McLoughlin is a partner in the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery LLP and is based in the Firm's New York office.  She focuses her practice on state and local tax matters, with particular skill working with financial services companies.

Alysse was most recently the head of state tax at Barclays Capital, where she was responsible for all including income, franchise, sales and use, and excise tax issues.  Her responsibilities included establishment of state tax return filing positions and reserves, participation in the financial statement process, and the handling of all state tax audits.  She has also held positions as state tax counsel at Lehman Brothers and attorney in the chief counsel division of the Internal Revenue Services.

Alysse received her LL.M. from New York University School of Law and her J.D. from Fordham University School of Law.  She earned her B.A. from the State University of New York at Binghamton.

Alysse is admitted to practice in New York

212 547 5307
Kathleen Quinn, McDermott Will, State Tax Matters Lawyer, Corporate Development Attorney
Associate

Kathleen Quinn focuses her practice on state and local tax matters. She has represented corporations and individuals in New York State and New York City income tax controversies. She also has advised clients on the state and local consequences of corporate restructurings and other business transactions.

Previously, Kathleen worked at a Big Four accounting firm, where her practice focused exclusively on state and local tax.

(212) 547-5718
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