October 20, 2021

Volume XI, Number 293

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October 19, 2021

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October 18, 2021

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The Rest of the Story: Update on Puma 'Roar Mark' Trademark Dispute

In our Summer 2021 issue, we reported on the trademark infringement lawsuit filed by artist Christophe Roberts against Puma North America, Inc., in which the artist claimed that the athletic retailer wrongfully made use of his distinctive “Roar Mark” in “large national ad campaigns targeting its products to National Basketball League consumers.” Roberts v. Puma North America, Inc., Case No. 21-cv-2559 (S.D.N.Y. Filed March 25, 2021.)

Roberts is known for a series of sculptures that he created using recycled Nike shoeboxes, renowned among “sneakerheads” (individuals who collect and trade sneakers as a hobby). Puma incorporated arguably similar “teeth designs” into one of its apparel lines.

At the time of publication of our previous issue, Roberts had sought a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to prohibit Puma’s continued use of its allegedly infringing designs on apparel and in marketing and advertising. Puma had opposed Roberts’ motion, and the court had heard arguments on the motion but had not yet issued a ruling. This story now has a conclusion.

On May 12, the court denied Roberts’ request for a temporary restraining order and a preliminary injunction. It found that Roberts failed to demonstrate a likelihood of succeeding on the merits of his claims because Puma’s use of its own teeth designs was unlikely to confuse consumers into believing that Puma’s designs were produced by or affiliated with Roberts.

Following the court’s ruling, Puma filed an answer and a counterclaim to Roberts’ complaint. But shortly thereafter, the parties negotiated a confidential settlement agreement and stipulated to the dismissal of Roberts’ action. Without knowing the terms of settlement, it is difficult to assess how positive the outcome was for Puma. Nevertheless, the lawsuit is a reminder to all businesses that incorporating contemporary imagery into their fashions and advertising campaigns comes with risks, which they should have experienced counsel assess before proceeding.

 

©2021 Katten Muchin Rosenman LLPNational Law Review, Volume XI, Number 260
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About this Author

David Halberstadt entertainment industry Lawyer Katten Muchin Law Firm
Partner

David Halberstadter serves as deputy general counsel for the firm's four California offices. He is an established and well-respected presence in the entertainment industry, widely known for his clear, thoughtful advice and strategic litigation judgment in intellectual property and other entertainment matters. David represents traditional, institutional entertainment industry clients as well as new media companies, that come to him for his extensive experience, his practical, business-savvy approach, and his ability to aggressively prosecute and defend litigation relating to all aspects of...

310.788.4408
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