August 12, 2022

Volume XII, Number 224

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California Bill Extends CCPA Exemptions for Personal Information Collected by Employers and Businesses

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) currently exempts from its provisions certain information collected by a business about a natural person in the course of the person acting as a job applicant, employee, owner, director, officer, medical staff member, or contractor of a business. This exemption is set to expire on December 31, 2020. In addition, the so-called business-to-business exemption for transactions and communications with the business that occur solely within the context of the business conducting due diligence regarding or providing or receiving a product or service to or from that company, partnership, sole proprietorship, nonprofit, or government agency is also set to expire on December 31, 2020.

Recent legislation passed in California would extend both of the exemptions until January 1, 2022. Assembly bill 1281, (AB 1281) which was presented to Governor Gavin Newsom on September 8, 2020, extends the one-year exemption for employee information and business to business information for another year until January 1, 2022. The bill also provides that the extension of these exemptions is contingent upon voters not approving the ballot Proposition 24, known as the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (CPRA). Should the CPRA pass on November 3, it would extend these exemptions until January 1, 2023. Some other highlights of the CPRA include the creation of a new category of sensitive personal information (SPI) that would give consumers the power to restrict its use, a provision that allows consumers to prohibit businesses from tracking their precise geolocation to a location of approximately 250 acres, and the addition of email and passwords to the list of defined “personal information” included in a data breach.

The key takeaway here is that if AB 1281 is enacted or if Proposition 24 passes, employee/job applicant information as well as business-to-business communications will continue to be exempt from the CCPA. Both AB 1281 and AB 713 regarding medical information, which we wrote about recently here, are currently on Governor Newsom’s desk.

Copyright © 2022 Robinson & Cole LLP. All rights reserved.National Law Review, Volume X, Number 276
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About this Author

Deborah A. George, Robinson Cole, Cybersecurity lawyer
Counsel

Deborah George is a member of the firm’s Business Litigation Group as well as its Data Privacy + Cybersecurity Team.

Deb advises clients on and focuses her practice on data privacy and security, cybersecurity, and compliance with related state and federal laws. She also has experience providing counsel in civil litigation and employment law matters.  She has significant experience offering advice and counsel on legal issues related to human services agencies, including Medicaid, as well as  drafting and reviewing contracts, business associate agreements, and data use agreements. ...

401.709.3363
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