December 6, 2021

Volume XI, Number 340

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December 06, 2021

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Missouri Supreme Court Changes Rules For Challenging Timeliness Under The Missouri Human Rights Act

Many employers are now at risk of waiving timeliness defenses due to a recent Missouri Supreme Court decision that completely changes how they raise challenges to the timeliness of a discrimination claim under The Missouri Human Rights Act (“MHRA”). The MHRA provides that a charge of discrimination must be filed within 180 days of the act that is allegedly discriminatory. Previously, an employer could wait to challenge the timeliness of a claim until the employee actually sued the employer in court. But due to the court's decision, untimely allegations of discrimination should first be challenged while the charge of discrimination is pending before the Missouri Commission on Human Rights (“MCHR”).

If the MCHR issues a Notice of Right to Sue on a charge of discrimination that includes untimely claims, according to our state Supreme Court, the only way to challenge the timeliness of such claims is to file a lawsuit against the MCHR within 30 days of the Notice of Right to Sue asserting that the Commission lacks authority to issue the Notice of Right to Sue. If an employer does not file a timely lawsuit, the Supreme Court now says the employer cannot later challenge the timeliness of the charge or lawsuit. Thus, an employee can file a charge that is clearly barred by the statute of limitations, obtain a Notice of Right to Sue from the MCHR, and avoid having those claims dismissed if the employer fails to file a timely lawsuit against the MCHR contesting its authority to issue the Notice of Right to Sue.

If you are an employer, it is imperative that the following steps be taken promptly:

  1. Determine whether the MCHR has issued a Notice of Right to Sue involving your company within the last 30 days. If you wish to dispute the timeliness of claims made in the charge of discrimination, according to the Supreme Court’s decision, you must sue the MCHR within 30 days of the date on the Notice of Right to Sue. If you fail to do this, you likely will not be permitted to raise a timeliness challenge if the employee sues. In other words, even though you do not know if the employee is going to sue you, you will have to sue the MCHR in order to preserve your defense that the employee’s claims are barred by the statute of limitations.

  2. Review every charge of discrimination against you that is pending with the MCHR or pending before the EEOC if the employee worked in the State of Missouri. For each charge, you must insure that you have appropriately challenged the timeliness of the charge and the MCHR’s authority to issue a Notice of Right to Sue with respect to untimely claims.

© Copyright 2021 Armstrong Teasdale LLP. All rights reserved National Law Review, Volume III, Number 255
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About this Author

Jeremy M. Brenner, Labor Law Attorney, Armstrong Teasdale Law firm
Associate

Jeremy Brenner, a member of Armstrong Teasdale’s Employment & Labor and Non-Compete/Trade Secrets practice groups, combines his experience and education in human resources and law to provide clients with a unique perspective on the challenges they face in the workplace. In addition to providing guidance, he is both a trial attorney and a certified mediator who is trained to assist parties in amicably resolving disputes without resorting to the time and expense of traditional litigation.

314-342-4184
Shelley Ericsson, Labor, Employment, Attorney, Armstrong Teasdale, law firm
Partner

Shelley Ericsson provides practical, sophisticated advice to complex legal problems unique to the labor and employment arena.

In state and federal courts and before state, federal, and local administrative agencies, Shelley defends employers in matters involving claims of discrimination, harassment, retaliation and wages. With a deep knowledge of employment law policies and an eye on the ever-changing economic reality, she litigates matters such as Title VII, Section 1981, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the Americans with...

816-472-3143
Jovita M. Foster, Armstrong Teasdale Law Firm, Labor Law Attorney
Partner

Jovita Foster is an accomplished litigator working with small- to medium-sized businesses, public utilities, and Fortune 100 and 500 companies in all facets of employment and labor law.

In state and federal jurisdictions and in front of the Appeals Tribunal, Jovita defends employers and managers in disputes involving claims of discrimination, retaliation, violations of public policy, sexual harassment, wrongful termination, and unemployment appeals. She successfully defends employers and managers in arbitration. Jovita also represents broker-dealers in...

314-552-6698
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