December 10, 2019

December 09, 2019

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Time’s Up—and so Is the Current Minimum Wage in Connecticut

Attention, Connecticut employers. October 1, 2019, marks the implementation of two new Connecticut laws. First, Connecticut will begin gradually increasing its minimum wage on October 1, 2019, raising the minimum wage to $11.00 an hour. Second, Connecticut’s Time’s Up Act, which extends sexual harassment training requirements to all employers in the state, also goes into effect. Now is the time to make sure that your policies and procedures are in compliance.

Minimum Wage

The increase of Connecticut’s minimum hourly wage to $11.00 on October 1 is the first in a series of gradual increases that will ultimately raise the state’s minimum hourly wage to $15.00. The subsequent pay increase steps are as follows:

  • $12.00 on September 1, 2020

  • $13.00 on August 1, 2021

  • $14.00 on July 1, 2022

  • $15.00 on June 1, 2023

Sexual Harassment Training

Also starting October 1, 2019, employers with three or more employees must provide two hours of sexual harassment training to all employees—both supervisory and nonsupervisory—within the first six months of their employment. For current employees, the training must be completed by October 1, 2020, unless the employer previously provided such training after October 1, 2018, in which case the employer does not have to repeat the instruction.

For employers with fewer than three employees, employees hired or promoted into supervisory positions on or after October 1, 2019, must receive two hours of sexual harassment training within six months of hire or promotion. For current supervisors, the two hours of sexual harassment training must be completed by October 1, 2020, unless the employer previously provided such training after October 1, 2018.

Connecticut employers may want to review their training, posting, and notice policies to ensure they comply with the new law’s protections. Compliance is particularly important in light of the heightened penalties employers face under the law and given that the law authorizes a representative of the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities to enter an employer’s place of business to determine whether the employer is complying with the posting and training requirements. An in-depth discussion of the sexual harassment training requirements, including notice requirements, corrective action, and penalties, can be found in our article of July 2, 2019, “Time’s Up: Connecticut Employers to Prepare for New Sexual Harassment Training and Protections.”

© 2019, Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C., All Rights Reserved.

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About this Author

Kelly Cardin Employment lawyer Ogletree Deakins.
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Kelly M. Cardin is an associate in the Stamford office of Ogletree Deakins. Her practice focuses on representing employers in a wide range of disputes, including those involving discrimination and retaliation claims, wage and hour claims, wrongful discharge claims, and claims under the FMLA. Kelly also represents employers in class action lawsuits, often involving wage and hour issues. Additionally, she maintains a commercial litigation practice, representing companies in breach of contract and trade secret disputes, among others. Kelly has represented clients before the...

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Associate

Nicole S. Mulé is an associate in the Stamford office of Ogletree Deakins. Nicole devotes a substantial amount of her practice to employment litigation where she defends employers in a wide range of disputes including those involving discrimination, retaliation, harassment, wrongful termination, and breach of contract claims. Nicole represents employers in state and federal court and she regularly handles agency matters before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, and the Connecticut Department of Labor.

In addition, Nicole has defended employers in class action lawsuits involving wage and hour issues. She has experience defending employers against claims for unpaid minimum wage, overtime and tip credit violations.

Outside of the firm, Nicole serves as a Board Member for the Hartford Marathon Foundation, a not for profit organization whose mission is to encourage individuals and families to adopt and maintain a healthy and active lifestyle.

Nicole is admitted to practice in Connecticut and Massachusetts.

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