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Volume XI, Number 300

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ICANN Publishes List of New gTLD Registry Applications

Release of list is an important step toward what likely will be a dramatic change to the Internet; interested parties have until August 12 to submit comments.

On June 13, 2012, after almost two months of delays, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), a California nonprofit organization tasked with administering certain Internet governance functions, published a list of the applications that it received from parties seeking to operate new generic Top-Level Domain (gTLD) registries. Additional information regarding ICANN's new gTLD program may be found in our September 9, 2011, LawFlash, available online here.

In total, ICANN received 1,930 applications for 1,700 new gTLD strings intended for use by various parties (i.e., general consumers, specifically identified Internet and/or geographic communities, individual corporations and their customers, and non-English, foreign-language speakers). A full list of the applied-for gTLD strings is available online here. Additional information regarding each applied-for gTLD string may also be found online here.

Interested parties now have 60 days (or until August 12, 2012) to submit public comments to ICANN for consideration by either ICANN's evaluating committees or the dispute resolution providers that have contracted with ICANN to coordinate claims under ICANN's established dispute resolutions procedures (e.g., the World Intellectual Property Organization).

ICANN has established dispute resolution procedures based upon four grounds: string confusion objections, legal rights objections, limited public interest objections, and community objections. Of these procedures, the legal rights objection procedure will likely be the most useful to trademark owners. The window for submitting an objection under one of these procedures will last approximately seven months (or until January 13, 2013), but may close sooner.

Given the foregoing information, we encourage clients to review the list of applied-for gTLD strings and consider whether any of these strings infringe upon or otherwise undermine their rights.

Copyright © 2021 by Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP. All Rights Reserved.National Law Review, Volume II, Number 168
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About this Author

Karen Butcher, Morgan Lewis, Intellectual Property Attorney
Partner

Recognized for her intellectual property (IP) work, Karen A. Butcher advises clients on maximizing the value of their IP and protecting their intellectual assets. She focuses on brands, creative works, technology, and related IP. Karen handles transactions and helps clients to structure the ownership and licensing of IP within their corporate group and to resolve complex disputes when they arise. A practice leader in the firm’s intellectual property practice, Karen brings an international perspective to strategic business matters in various sectors, including retail and...

202-739-5526
Ron Dreben, intellectual property lawyer, Morgan Lewis
Partner

Ron N. Dreben advises clients on intellectual property and technology issues in business transactions. He provides advice in connection with mergers, acquisitions, and licensing arrangements, as well as trademark, copyright, trade secret, and related IP law. A Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP), Ron helps companies address privacy issues and respond to security breaches and advises US companies on the relevance of the EU Data Directive. Ron has experience negotiating with most of the leading technology product and service vendors.

202.739.5213
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