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Volume XII, Number 279

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NLRB Alters Timing Requirements for Electronic Notice Posting in Workplaces Impacted by COVID-19

In a decision issued on June 2, the National Labor Relations Board modified the timing of its electronic notice-posting requirement in circumstances where an employer has not yet reopened its facility due to COVID-19, or where a substantial complement of employees has not yet returned to work on-site when the employer “may be communicating with its employees by ‘electronic means’” (e.g., internet, intranet, email, etc.).

Prior to this decision, the Board temporarily suspended its standard remedial requirement that an employer must post a notice to employees at the involved facility within 14 days after the employer is served with the decision of an unfair labor practice, notifying employees of the employer’s violation and advising employees of their rights under the Act.  For employers that were closed or where employees were not yet reporting to work, employers were not required to post physical notices or distribute electronic notices until 14 days after the involved facility reopened and “a substantial complement of employees ha[d] returned.”

Reasoning that “prompt posting of the notice by electronic means will best effectuate the purposes of the Act by providing employees with timely notice of the unfair labor practices and the steps the Respondent will take to remedy them” the Board has reverted to its previous standard requirement with respect to electronic notification.  Now, the employer should again electronically notify its employees “within 14 days after service [of the unfair labor practice decision] by the Region.”  In addition to electronic posting, the employer should also post physical notices within 14 days after the reopening and staffing of a “substantial complement of employees.”

As we discussed here, the Board has not further defined what constitutes “a substantial complement of employees” in this context.  That said, the substantial complement concept is frequently used by the NLRB as one of the factors determining whether a company is a “successor” employer under the Act.  Based on this standard, the Board likely will consider whether a majority of the job classifications are filled and the operation is engaged in substantially normal production.

Characterizing its decision as one that “simply removes an unnecessary delay” in communication with employees, the majority gave little deference to certain Board Members’ concerns that the combined notice-posting period will likely now extend beyond the current-standard 60 days for certain employers.  Notably, the Majority specifically stated its decision “makes notice posting for more than 60 days a standard remedy for a subset of employers, at least until the Board returns to its pre-pandemic notice-posting remedy.”

© 2022 Proskauer Rose LLP. National Law Review, Volume XII, Number 154
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About this Author

Joshua Fox Labor & Employment Attorney Proskauer Rose
Associate

Joshua Fox is an associate in the Labor & Employment Law Department and a member of the Labor-Management Relations Group. He represents a diverse range of clients, including professional sports leagues and teams, hotels, hospitals, and pipe line contractors, among many others, in collective bargaining, administration of their collective bargaining agreements, arbitrations and matters before the National Labor Relations Board.

In particular, Josh has extensive experience representing professional sports leagues, including Major League...

212.969.3507
Associate

Dylan Tedford is an associate in our Labor and Employment Department. Dylan graduated from the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, where he was a member of the Hale Moot Court Honors Program and served in several student organizations. While at USC, he was a legal extern for Judge Gregg Zive in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Nevada. Prior to law school, Dylan was a government affairs coordinator for a lobbying firm in Nevada.

310-557-4566
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